Tuesday, June 28, 2022

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Officials Strive to Curb Worry About Coronavirus

Further, he said, “The current mortality rate only reflects those who have had severe illness … As more people are tested the mortality rate is bound to go down.”

That said, elderly people and those with challenged immune systems or pre-existing medical conditions need to take caution.

Whether schools will be closed for a period, or what other quarantine measures might go into place, were among unanswered questions from among some 75 people who attended the forum, which was also simulcast on the Internet.

“I want to emphasize that the town’s and the Westport Public Schools’ (WPS) decisions will be guided by the information and recommendations of the Westport Weston Health District,” First Selectman Jim Marpe said.

“I’m confident that the town and public schools will make decisions based on medical science and sound disease-control experience,” he said.

WestportNow.com Image
Louis Donofrio, director of clinical care with the Westport Weston Health District, shares information on preventing the illness for individuals. (CLICK TO ENLARGE) Jarret Liotta for WestportNow.com

Officials all stressed that they are sharing information several times a day, further cautioning the public to gather their own only from reliable sources.

“We’re all going to be sharing the same information,” said Cooper, noting the health district’s site—www.WWHD.org—is linked to both the town and WPS websites.

“I’m not panicking,” said Sue Pfister, executive director of the Center for Senior Activities, which is remaining open at this time.

Like officials at the schools, Town Hall, and even the library itself, she said extra care is being taken with cleaning and sanitizing.

“I have no restrictions on people coming in,” she said, at the same time noting that her constituents there have been proactive in no visiting the center if they have felt any sort of illness coming on.

“I would hate to have to close down for two weeks,” Pfister said, noting that plans are also being looked at for those who are serviced with delivered meals.

Likewise, Suzanne Levasseur, health services supervisor for the WPS, said it would be a shame to close the schools but they would do so if it got to the point where it could be pivotal in helping control the spread of the virus.

“The decision is ultimately the superintendent’s,” she said, but noted he has been in regular discussion with town officials.

WestportNow.com Image
Audience members listen to today’s forum. (CLICK TO ENLARGE) Facebook photo

“We do follow well-established guidelines that are evidence-based,” she said, commending the experience and judgment of the nursing staff.

“Can we really trust what the CDC is telling you?” one resident asked, citing national politics.

Cooper said Yes, noting they were considered one of the best sources of information.

Another resident asked about train travel, and while Cooper said there was no particular need to be worried about it—especially as transit officials are also engaged in much more extensive cleaning procedures—he cautioned that those who are at high risk of contracting the illness “might want to consider alternate means of travel” for the immediate future.

“We want to reduce exposure,” said Louis Donofrio, director of clinical care at the health district.

“If you think you have the flu, don’t go out shopping and sneezing on everyone,” he said.

About halfway through the forum, an attendee noted that word was just received of the first case to appear over the border in Wilton.

“There you go!” Cooper said.

“The good news is,” said State Rep. Jonathan Steinberg, “is that the people we entrust with looking out for our interest have been talking.”

“Almost every day something new is being learned and is being incorporate,” Cooper said of reaction to the virus.

He and others likened it to other viruses that have sparked health crises, and again reminded everyone to not panic but exercise precaution.

“Warm soap and water,” Cooper said. “That’s really our recommendation.”

Further, he said, “The current mortality rate only reflects those who have had severe illness … As more people are tested the mortality rate is bound to go down.”

That said, elderly people and those with challenged immune systems or pre-existing medical conditions need to take caution.

Whether schools will be closed for a period, or what other quarantine measures might go into place, were among unanswered questions from among some 75 people who attended the forum, which was also simulcast on the Internet.

“I want to emphasize that the town’s and the Westport Public Schools’ (WPS) decisions will be guided by the information and recommendations of the Westport Weston Health District,” First Selectman Jim Marpe said.

“I’m confident that the town and public schools will make decisions based on medical science and sound disease-control experience,” he said.

WestportNow.com Image
Louis Donofrio, director of clinical care with the Westport Weston Health District, shares information on preventing the illness for individuals. (CLICK TO ENLARGE) Jarret Liotta for WestportNow.com

Officials all stressed that they are sharing information several times a day, further cautioning the public to gather their own only from reliable sources.

“We’re all going to be sharing the same information,” said Cooper, noting the health district’s site—www.WWHD.org—is linked to both the town and WPS websites.

“I’m not panicking,” said Sue Pfister, executive director of the Center for Senior Activities, which is remaining open at this time.

Like officials at the schools, Town Hall, and even the library itself, she said extra care is being taken with cleaning and sanitizing.

“I have no restrictions on people coming in,” she said, at the same time noting that her constituents there have been proactive in no visiting the center if they have felt any sort of illness coming on.

“I would hate to have to close down for two weeks,” Pfister said, noting that plans are also being looked at for those who are serviced with delivered meals.

Likewise, Suzanne Levasseur, health services supervisor for the WPS, said it would be a shame to close the schools but they would do so if it got to the point where it could be pivotal in helping control the spread of the virus.

“The decision is ultimately the superintendent’s,” she said, but noted he has been in regular discussion with town officials.

WestportNow.com Image
Audience members listen to today’s forum. (CLICK TO ENLARGE) Facebook photo

“We do follow well-established guidelines that are evidence-based,” she said, commending the experience and judgment of the nursing staff.

“Can we really trust what the CDC is telling you?” one resident asked, citing national politics.

Cooper said Yes, noting they were considered one of the best sources of information.

Another resident asked about train travel, and while Cooper said there was no particular need to be worried about it—especially as transit officials are also engaged in much more extensive cleaning procedures—he cautioned that those who are at high risk of contracting the illness “might want to consider alternate means of travel” for the immediate future.

“We want to reduce exposure,” said Louis Donofrio, director of clinical care at the health district.

“If you think you have the flu, don’t go out shopping and sneezing on everyone,” he said.

About halfway through the forum, an attendee noted that word was just received of the first case to appear over the border in Wilton.

“There you go!” Cooper said.

“The good news is,” said State Rep. Jonathan Steinberg, “is that the people we entrust with looking out for our interest have been talking.”

“Almost every day something new is being learned and is being incorporate,” Cooper said of reaction to the virus.

He and others likened it to other viruses that have sparked health crises, and again reminded everyone to not panic but exercise precaution.

“Warm soap and water,” Cooper said. “That’s really our recommendation.”

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