Wednesday, May 25, 2022

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Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2020


Westport Town Offices, Schools, & Senior Center are closed.
9 a.m. – Electronically – Board of Selectmen: live streamed on http://www.westportct.gov, Optimum ch. 79, Frontier ch. 6020
Noon – 4 p.m. – MoCA Westport – “Helmut Lang: 41.1595° N, 73.3882° W”
2 p.m. – 6 p.m. – Westport Library – Open for limited services
7 p.m. – Virtual Westport Library – Environmental Book Discussion: “No One is Too Small to Make a Difference”

Westport Senior Center YouTube Channel
Westport Library Event Calendar
Westport Library YouTube Page
Earthplace YouTube Channel
Virtual Westport Museum for History & Culture
See more events: Celebrate Westport Calendar

Joan L. Minot, 94

Good friends, Averill and George Loh, introduced her to Henry S. Jacobson in high school. Several years and relationships later they married, moving to Ridgefield in 1953.

Henry was the son of Dorothy Blanchard Hammerstein and stepson of Oscar Hammerstein II, so Oscar’s shows and music were an exciting addition to their lives. They had four children.

After 23 years they called it quits and Joan married the much loved motorcycling riding thoracic surgeon, Henry D Minot III, who had five children. So now there were nine,.

Joan was known for great parties and being a member and sometimes president of two Ridgefield Garden Clubs.

For a few years she enjoyed having a landscaping business with Bill Rodier of Rodier Flowers and loved designing and landscaping custom made in-ground pools that blended with the environment.

Joan was a devoted member of a bridge club that lasted 60 years as well as a women’s investment group called Uptick for 45 years.

Only recently, due to failing eyesight, did Joan stop doing her own investing. She volunteered with Visiting Nurses, played tennis, and liked watching all kinds of sports on television.

After 55 years in Ridgefield Joan moved to the retirement community of Meadow Ridg There she played in croquet tournaments, was a member of the opera club and, for several years, did accounting on the store computer, stockpiling the store with bread.

Joan was predeceased by her daughter Abigail Jacobson and her husband Henry Minot III. She is survived by her brother, Dick Lochner- FL and her children; Kathryn Jacobson and husband Paul Cooke- CA, H. Paul Jacobson and wife Leny Jacobson- CT, Matthew Jacobson- KY; stepchildren; Abby Minot-CA, Sarah Minot Gelabert-CA, Henry D. Minot IV-CT, Ione Minot-VT and Reid Minot-TX; her grandchildren; Kiaora Fox-CA, Kathryn Jacobson-NY, Andrew and Alex Jacobson-Ct., Leah Jacobson-CA, Joan Cary Seymour-GA, Theodore Jacobson-NY and Eric Jacobson-KY; great-grandchildren; Osiris Fox, Isaiah and Ajala Fox-Kovach-CA; her many nieces and nephews by blood and marriages; good friends, Averill Loh and family and Jo Peacock.

Due to COVID-19 there will be no memorial at this time. In the end it’s all about LOVE and you Joan aka Mom aka Grandma were the shining example of love, humor, encouragement and wisdom. It will be so hard not to have you here but you are free now and you can see again. Thank you for leaving so much love in our worlds. We hope to pass it on as well as you did.

Contributions in her memory may be made to the Connecticut Lion’s Eye Research Foundation, PO Box 848, Watertown, CT 06795.

Good friends, Averill and George Loh, introduced her to Henry S. Jacobson in high school. Several years and relationships later they married, moving to Ridgefield in 1953.

Henry was the son of Dorothy Blanchard Hammerstein and stepson of Oscar Hammerstein II, so Oscar’s shows and music were an exciting addition to their lives. They had four children.

After 23 years they called it quits and Joan married the much loved motorcycling riding thoracic surgeon, Henry D Minot III, who had five children. So now there were nine,.

Joan was known for great parties and being a member and sometimes president of two Ridgefield Garden Clubs.

For a few years she enjoyed having a landscaping business with Bill Rodier of Rodier Flowers and loved designing and landscaping custom made in-ground pools that blended with the environment.

Joan was a devoted member of a bridge club that lasted 60 years as well as a women’s investment group called Uptick for 45 years.

Only recently, due to failing eyesight, did Joan stop doing her own investing. She volunteered with Visiting Nurses, played tennis, and liked watching all kinds of sports on television.

After 55 years in Ridgefield Joan moved to the retirement community of Meadow Ridg There she played in croquet tournaments, was a member of the opera club and, for several years, did accounting on the store computer, stockpiling the store with bread.

Joan was predeceased by her daughter Abigail Jacobson and her husband Henry Minot III. She is survived by her brother, Dick Lochner- FL and her children; Kathryn Jacobson and husband Paul Cooke- CA, H. Paul Jacobson and wife Leny Jacobson- CT, Matthew Jacobson- KY; stepchildren; Abby Minot-CA, Sarah Minot Gelabert-CA, Henry D. Minot IV-CT, Ione Minot-VT and Reid Minot-TX; her grandchildren; Kiaora Fox-CA, Kathryn Jacobson-NY, Andrew and Alex Jacobson-Ct., Leah Jacobson-CA, Joan Cary Seymour-GA, Theodore Jacobson-NY and Eric Jacobson-KY; great-grandchildren; Osiris Fox, Isaiah and Ajala Fox-Kovach-CA; her many nieces and nephews by blood and marriages; good friends, Averill Loh and family and Jo Peacock.

Due to COVID-19 there will be no memorial at this time. In the end it’s all about LOVE and you Joan aka Mom aka Grandma were the shining example of love, humor, encouragement and wisdom. It will be so hard not to have you here but you are free now and you can see again. Thank you for leaving so much love in our worlds. We hope to pass it on as well as you did.

Contributions in her memory may be made to the Connecticut Lion’s Eye Research Foundation, PO Box 848, Watertown, CT 06795.

Thunderstorm Brings Down Trees, Power Lines

A police marine unit assisted numerous kayakers caught up in the storm, according to radio reports.

The National Weather Service at about 5 p.m. had issued a Severe Thunderstorm Watch for Westport and area until 6 p.m.

A police marine unit assisted numerous kayakers caught up in the storm, according to radio reports.

The National Weather Service at about 5 p.m. had issued a Severe Thunderstorm Watch for Westport and area until 6 p.m.

Marpe: Not So Fast on $40 Million for Cribari

For Westport, the TIP includes $40 million beginning in 2023 for the rehabilitation or replacement of the state-owned Cribari Bridge.

In 2017, First Selectman Jim Marpe said no to the funding since there had been no intended plan to rehabilitate the bridge, nor an environmental impact report.

“My staff and I will follow the TIP closely and continue to stay abreast of the environmental findings for the Cribari Bridge rehabilitation or replacement options,” Marpe said.

“I remain committed to keeping the residents and businesses of Westport informed in a timely manner about this very important project.”

For Westport, the TIP includes $40 million beginning in 2023 for the rehabilitation or replacement of the state-owned Cribari Bridge.

In 2017, First Selectman Jim Marpe said no to the funding since there had been no intended plan to rehabilitate the bridge, nor an environmental impact report.

“My staff and I will follow the TIP closely and continue to stay abreast of the environmental findings for the Cribari Bridge rehabilitation or replacement options,” Marpe said.

“I remain committed to keeping the residents and businesses of Westport informed in a timely manner about this very important project.”

On Tour

WestportNow.com Image
Officials head up Church Lane today, including, from left, State Sen. Will Haskell, State Rep. Jonathan Steinberg, Sal Liccione, District 9 RTM member, First Selectman Jim Marpe, U.S. Rep. Jim Himes, and Randy Herbertsen, president of the Downtown Merchants Association. They were checking on local businesses following the storm and to see how they were coping with COVID-19. (CLICK TO ENLARGE) Jarret Liotta for WestportNow.com

Himes & Officials Visit Local Businesses

“I think there’s a real effort to look at the monopoly power these companies have,” Himes said, among elected officials in Washington, D.C., with questions also under examination regarding tax advantages for such large businesses.

Himes did much more listening than talking, however, though he shared some reflections relating to insights he also heard from Julie Cook, manager of Savannah Bee Company, and Bill Taibe, owner of Don Memo Restaurant — the two other spots he visited.

“We are all adopting to the pandemic because we don’t know when the end is going to be,” said State Rep. Jonathan Steinberg, who joined in the tour alongside First Selectman Jim Marpe, State. Sen. Will Haskell, Sal Liccione, District 9 Representative Town Meeting member, and Randy Herbertsen, president of the Westport Downtown Merchants Association.

“So, any opportunity for people to get together and figure out how to help is appreciated,” he said.

Himes noted that it must be a “strange negotiation” for commercial property owners to work through arrangements with tenants like Taibe, who rents space for his Don Memo eatery at 90 Post Road East, the old town hall.

While he has suffered the pandemic’s impact to his business and its income, property owners also have mortgages and taxes facing them, he said.

“It does them no good if this space goes empty,” Taibe said, who is also looking ahead to cold weather when his 60 outdoor seats are no longer viable and he has to make due with 50% indoor occupancy only, which is around 35 customers.

“I’m really concerned with what’s going to happen a few months from now, what that’s going to look like,” he said.

Taibe, who also owns The Whelk and Kawa Ni in Saugatuck, said overall his business is down 20 to 30%, though he’s been able to bring in more employees since the initial shutdown in March.

“You learned who your essential workers were in a pandemic,” he said.

Taibe said, however, that some employees have chosen to not even come back because of economics.

“They said to me, candidly, ‘I make more money staying home. Why would I want to come back,’” he reported.

Norton, meanwhile, has been surprised to receive so many unemployment claims in her small business, including from people who were only with her a couple of weeks during the holidays.

“I’ve heard that a couple of times,” Himes said, questioning the system at large.

“ I don’t understand why unemployment isn’t simple wage replacement … I don’t quite get why the system isn’t that way,” he said.

Ironically, both Norton and Taibe expressed significant gratitude for the states of their individual businesses, and both shared concerns for others who haven’t had the advantages they enjoy.

“There are some restaurants outside of this area that are doing far worse than we are,” Taibe said, noting the local community has been supportive.

Ironically, Cook said business has picked up considerably in the last couple weeks.

“People seem to be getting a little more courageous about coming, and they’re being safe about coming,” she said, respecting the mask guidelines.

“We really want to stay here,” she said of Westport, noting most of the company’s other 12 stores are throughout the south. “We love this town.”

“I think there’s a real effort to look at the monopoly power these companies have,” Himes said, among elected officials in Washington, D.C., with questions also under examination regarding tax advantages for such large businesses.

Himes did much more listening than talking, however, though he shared some reflections relating to insights he also heard from Julie Cook, manager of Savannah Bee Company, and Bill Taibe, owner of Don Memo Restaurant — the two other spots he visited.

“We are all adopting to the pandemic because we don’t know when the end is going to be,” said State Rep. Jonathan Steinberg, who joined in the tour alongside First Selectman Jim Marpe, State. Sen. Will Haskell, Sal Liccione, District 9 Representative Town Meeting member, and Randy Herbertsen, president of the Westport Downtown Merchants Association.

“So, any opportunity for people to get together and figure out how to help is appreciated,” he said.

Himes noted that it must be a “strange negotiation” for commercial property owners to work through arrangements with tenants like Taibe, who rents space for his Don Memo eatery at 90 Post Road East, the old town hall.

While he has suffered the pandemic’s impact to his business and its income, property owners also have mortgages and taxes facing them, he said.

“It does them no good if this space goes empty,” Taibe said, who is also looking ahead to cold weather when his 60 outdoor seats are no longer viable and he has to make due with 50% indoor occupancy only, which is around 35 customers.

“I’m really concerned with what’s going to happen a few months from now, what that’s going to look like,” he said.

Taibe, who also owns The Whelk and Kawa Ni in Saugatuck, said overall his business is down 20 to 30%, though he’s been able to bring in more employees since the initial shutdown in March.

“You learned who your essential workers were in a pandemic,” he said.

Taibe said, however, that some employees have chosen to not even come back because of economics.

“They said to me, candidly, ‘I make more money staying home. Why would I want to come back,’” he reported.

Norton, meanwhile, has been surprised to receive so many unemployment claims in her small business, including from people who were only with her a couple of weeks during the holidays.

“I’ve heard that a couple of times,” Himes said, questioning the system at large.

“ I don’t understand why unemployment isn’t simple wage replacement … I don’t quite get why the system isn’t that way,” he said.

Ironically, both Norton and Taibe expressed significant gratitude for the states of their individual businesses, and both shared concerns for others who haven’t had the advantages they enjoy.

“There are some restaurants outside of this area that are doing far worse than we are,” Taibe said, noting the local community has been supportive.

Ironically, Cook said business has picked up considerably in the last couple weeks.

“People seem to be getting a little more courageous about coming, and they’re being safe about coming,” she said, respecting the mask guidelines.

“We really want to stay here,” she said of Westport, noting most of the company’s other 12 stores are throughout the south. “We love this town.”

Restaurant Briefing

WestportNow.com Image
Bill Taibe (r), owner of Don Memo Restaurant, 90 Post Road East, and others, today briefs officials on his businesses, including, from l., First Selectman Jim Marpe, Randy Herbertsen, president of the Downtown Merchants Association, State Rep. Jonathan Steinberg, and U.S. Rep. Jim Himes. They toured downtown businesses to see how they were doing during the pandemic and after the tropical storm. (CLICK TO ENLARGE) Jarret Liotta for WestportNow.com